Sang Ye (Mulberry leaf)

$1

Chinese Herb Sang Ye (Mulberry Leaf)

Other Names: 

Sang Ye, Morus Leaf, Mulberry Leaf, Morus alba L.; Folium Mori 

Properties:

Bitter, Cool, Sweet

Channels Entered:

Lung, Liver

Functions:

Fever and Headache Reducer, Antibiotic, Anti-Inflammatory, Anti-Septic

Other Information: 

Sang Ye grows natively and is cultivated in many provinces of China including Sichuan, Guangdong, Anhui, Hunan, and Zhejiang. Other varieties of mulberry also grow in North America.  Mulberry is a small, deciduous tree, and Sang Ye is the leaves that are harvested.  Often, Sany Ye is harvested as a second-growth leaf and then tried before being powdered.  The powder itself can be consumed orally, or boiled into soup and tea.  Morus alba L is also sometimes processed by being fried with honey, which enhances the herbs' natural abilities to arrest cough and moisten the lungs. For oral use, Sang Ye is commonly combined with Chrysanthemum. 

In comparison to Sang Zhi (which is also from the Mulberry plant), Sang Ye better dispels exterior wind of the head and face while Sang Zhi cools heat and relieves pain through the limbs and joints. 

Active in the liver, Sang Ye relieves eye problems that are symptoms of Yin Deficiency, as well, it can help reduce vertigo, painful eyes, and spots in vision.  Sang Ye can also be prepared and used topically as an eye was in the presence of such eye problems and is sometimes used in place of antibiotics through injection. 

Those with cold or weak lungs should use caution when taking Mulberry leaf as well as those with Qi Deficiency. 

Sang Ye is most often combined with Ju Hua, Jie Geng, and Xing Ren to help ease symptoms of Wind-heat, cough, and headache from Warm-Dryness disorders respectively.  In China, Sang Ye is traditionally used to stop menstruation, nose bleeds, and swelling. It is most effective to use Sang Ye at the onset of feverish conditions, including those of swelling, headache, pain and coughing. 

Some of the active components in Sang Ye are flavonoids and sterols such as quercetin and stigmasterol. This herb also contains many volatile oils and important acids. 

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